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20100901
20100930
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KTVU (FOX) 10
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
and maureen naylor reports. >> reporter: a symphony of sounds is filling the air in the heart of silicon valley. . from ragtime, impromptu concerts on 20 pianos are playing out day by day they are part of a new art exhibit called playing me i'm yours. >> piano players, it's just that we never had a piano to play his. >> reporter: san jose is the third city in north america to host this exhibit. >> music is something that feels right when it's their mac so coming up here and coming and having a different mindset. >> reporter: from this high school student plane prelude in g. minor to this homeless man playing the nonmeat each piano is drawing a range of people and sounds. some inspect the instrument in some show off there fancy finger work and some are plain piano for their first time. >> the goal behind the project is to place pianos in community meeting places where people might not otherwise have a reason to speak to each other. >> which is what we found that these two men which just met. >> i am kind of a hermit. i don't know that many people. i played a piano and people come around
the cleanup effort may cost. maureen naylor is live with our report. >> reporter: the official cleanup begins at 8:00 a.m. tomorrow morning. it was supposed to start today but was delayed to get all of the equipment in place. i want to point out to you, this behind me, in the last hour, he spoke to the owners of this home and they said theirs will be the -- will be among the first tomorrow. the biggest concern is the delicate removal of toxic waste in the rubble. >> we know the material contains levels of metal, potential, asbestos, all sorts of other chemicals. the material handled is hopefully not going to become a health problem. >> reporter: as of tomorrow, the county says this burn area will be offlimits to homeowners, though several people sifted through the rubble today. >> our home is destroyed. there's probably some little things that are still inside there. >> i'm curious how they are gonna protect the houses from this constant wind that comes off the ocean that's right down the street. you know, the cleanup they have done now, are they gonna have to reclean it after that? >> report
beginning a separate investigation. ktvu maureen naylor is in san bruno with a look at what they're up against. >> reporter: julie, there are weeks of work still ahead. this property on fairmont driver was one of the first to be cleaned up. remarkably some of their most important documents survivorred because of one safety -- survived because of one safety precaution. >> reporter: carolyn gray showed us their bank statements along with their insurance documents. at their properties this afternoon, crews used an excavator to pick up the charred rem remnants of what was once the gray's home. >> almost a sense of closure. it's really over. i thought it would be more emotional to see it all disappear and it wasn't. >> reporter: the degree is being wrapped in plastic and taken to the hayward landfill. another priority is removing this melted jungle gym. >> i'm hoping that what we do for them taking them off of their mind so they can come back in a few weeks and see a property that has been cleaned up will help them in their recovery process. >> we're happy to be in a rental house and
the second bay area city to enact such an ordnance. albany did it just a few months ago. maureen naylor is live with our report. >> reporter: the palo alto fire department wants to become equip with this fire detector saying it can better help save lives. >> we would probably save about a thousand lives a year. >> reporter: the palo alto fire marshal is trying to make this fire detector better. >> a photo electric alarm, uses a small beam of light and looks for reflections off of visible smoke parols particles in the air. so it's looking for smoke the way humans look at it. can i see it. >> reporter: he says that's what happened at this house fire two weeks ago. >> that fire was noticed by the occupants about 10 to 15 minutes before their alarm activated. >> we were lucky, we relevantly were lucky. >> reporter: lucky this neighbor says to have her home still standing after another fire scare. >> we were cooking soup and forgot about it. when we got home we realized it was burning. there was smoke, and it was so thick i was surprised the alarm didn't go off. >> reporter: photo electric
. maureen naylor is live with our report. >> reporter: the palo alto fire department wants to become equip with this fire detector saying it can better help save lives. >> we would probably save about a thousand lives a year. >> reporter: the palo alto fire marshal is trying to make this fire detector better. >> a photo electric alarm, uses a small beam of light and looks for reflections off of visible smoke parols particles in the air. so it's looking for smoke the way humans look at it. can i see it. >> reporter: he says that's what happened at this house fire two weeks ago. >> that fire was noticed by the occupants about 10 to 15 minutes before their alarm activated. >> we were lucky, we relevantly were lucky. >> reporter: lucky this neighbor says to have her home still standing after another fire scare. >> we were cooking soup and forgot about it. when we got home we realized it was burning. there was smoke, and it was so thick i was surprised the alarm didn't go off. >> reporter: photo electric alarms cost more about $15 compared to $10 compared to other alarms. developers in the pas
to inspect due to safety concern. ktvu's maureen naylor in san bruno with late details. maureen. >> reporter: kents official death count stands at four people with four others still missing. crews are still on the scene. this road remains blocked this hour and the ntsb says it could be another day were to before it completes its onsite investigation and since pg&e started to hand over its first documents today. this family walked into think san bruno foam home for the first time in three days and found their dinner from thursday night still on the counter. >> we left the food here, because we we are ready to eat at time when we heard the big boom, booming boom. >> reporter: what caused that gas line explosion last thursday remains under investigation. >> if we find any indication that this is a systematic problem through the system as opposed to local, right here, we will indicate that and recommend accordingly. >> reporter: the ntsb removed this 28-feet section of pipe, which was thrown 150 feet from underground. tonight its sending the piece to a washington, d.c. lab to further investiga
through the trash for a body. tonight the four known victims were memorialized. maureen naylor. >> reporter: mike, a candlelight vigil with those victims. while that ongoing search for that missing hercules minute turned up nothing today. [ music ] >> reporter: with music and cageds, organizers say the goal was to start the healing process. >> i didn't know anybody. but because it hit so close to home, it is just one of those things that you don't imagine happening in your area. and it's just really shocking. >> it is this type of tragedy is pretty tough for all of us to swallow. >> reporter: also tough for some to swallow, including in the prayer candles lit for the murder victims was one for the accused killer. >> my understanding is the folks from villaho would like us to include the suspect. and our response to them is we are not here to be judgmental. we are here to promote peace. >> reporter: this after more than a week of violence which ended with officers shooting and killing the man in richmond. he is suspted in the deaths of signed at this tran and mark and allan and
was the last time you saw anything like this? nearly 25 pianos placed all over the city. maureen naylor is there to explain. >> reporter: there's the sounds of tinkering pianos all over the bay area. and you'd be surprised who gets on these pianos. a symphony of sound is filling the bay area in the silican area. impromptu concerts are playing out as part of a new art exhibit called, play me i'm yours. >> piano players are the most derivative of all musicians. it's that we never have pianos to play. >> reporter: the silican valley is the first to get the exhibit, after new york. >> it puts you in a different mind set. >> reporter: from this high school student playing prelude in g minor. to this homeless man playing lean on me. every piano is drawing players. all with cars and light rails whizzing by. >> the goal is to place pianos in community meeting places in places where other wise people wouldn't have to speak to each other. >> reporter: where we found these two men that had just met. >> not only is this one of the greatest ideas san jose has ever had. but just the increasing and up
and there are more just sitting there. maureen naylor has this report. >> reporter: a symphony of sounds is filling the air in the heart of silican valley. from rag times, to ratmononof. impromptu concerts are going on it's part of a project called play me, i'm yours. from this high school student to this homeless man. some curiously inspect the instrument, others show off their fancy finger work. others are playing the piano for the first time, all with cars and trains whizzing by. >> the intent was to put it in an area where people would not talk to each other. >> i'm kind of a hermit. i don't know many people. but i play the piano and if people can sing, the better. >>> pianos will be up until september 21st, for a map of the locations go to ktvu.com. in san jose, maureen naylor. >>> vector control officials are issuing a warning about west nile virus after two dead animals tested positive for the disease. the virus has been found in a squirrel and raven last month. vector control is advising people to report dead birds and squirrels to authorities. west nile is usually spread through bites f
're walking down the street and you run into a piano and there are more just sitting there. maureen naylor has this report. >> reporter: a symphony of sounds is filling the air in the heart of silican valley. from rag times, to ratmononof. impromptu concerts are going on it's part of a project called play me, i'm yours. from this high school student to this homeless man. some curiously inspect the instrument, others show off their fancy finger work. others are playing the piano for the first time, all with cars and trains whizzing by. >> the intent was to put it in an area where people uld not talk to each other. >> i'm kind of a hermit. i don't know many people. but i play the piano and if people can sing, the better. >>> pianos will be up until september 21st, for a map of the locations go to ktvu.com. in san jose, maureen naylor. >>> vector control officials are issuing a warning about west nile virus after two dead animals tested positive for the disease. the virus has been found in a squirrel and raven last month. vector control is advising people to report dead birds and squirrels to
appeal to the nine circuit court of a pales for a stay. is he set to be executed 12:01 wednesday. maureen naylor at san quentib with the latest. >> reporter: he is essentially asking a federal appeals court to halt his execution, which is a little less than 48 hours away. the first person in line to be executed in california's newly- renovated death chambers is this man, albert greenwood brown. he was sentenced to die for rape and murdering and this afternoon brown's lawyers filed court papers appealing a judge's ruling yesterday, which allows his execution to move forward. >> i think there is a very good chance that execution may happen on wednesday night. >> reporter: this is a professor of law from santa clara university and says the ninth circuit court of pales will considerate case. >> even if the ninth circuit tries to stop it, the supreme court may intervene and say the execution could go forward. >> reporter: brown declined to meet a deadline to choose between one-drug or three-drug option. >> there are so many unanswered questions. >> reporter: one of those questions surround
their homes. rob roth has the stories of those first responders. first we go to maureen naylor who's is live tonight in san bruno. >> reporter: frank, that ntsb briefing is about to start in a few minutes behind me. today the city declared this a disaster area while the emotional toll is still being felt by some residents here. the images of charred remains in the middle of this san bruno neighborhood are still tough to grasp. burned out cars, stairs leading to nowhere. and for the family living next to the devastation, life is on hold. >> at least six months until we can get back into the house. how are you going to bring a two and don't know if i can com to this. >> reporter: and some children are haunted by the sounds of the fire. >> every time you hear the revs of engines or planes, it's the exact same sound that came. i can see why people thought it was an airplane. because it had that same kind of revving sound. and in fact, my kids are saying, is that the fire coming. >> reporter: pg & e crews worked on the neighborhood while the homes that have been green tagged are busy wi
highway will 84 to route 37 but for a price. maureen naylor joins us with the story. the signs are in place tonight. you can see part of the express way from where we are standing. seven hours from now north carolina's first toll lane will officially open. but carpoolers need to take precautions to make sure they are not charged unnecessarily. >> last-minute computer tests were underway this evening on new sensors along southbound 680 in fremont starting at 5:00 tomorrow morning, the system will give solo drivers the option to pay to drive with carpoolers in this express lane. marked off with double white lines. >> i think i would be willing to pay money as a single driver to drive on the express lane. >> why? >> because it will get me where i need to go faster. >> it is stupid because it is a lane that is already there that the taxpayers already paid for. so why make us pay more to just drive on it. >> the toll lane starts at highway 84 and stretches 14 miles stretch to highway north. here is how it works. you enter the express lane at certain points. on weekdays between 5:00
recovery, this comes after a lot of disaster. maureen naylor is live in san bruno with more. >> reporter: we have seen a lot of the devastation zone. behind me, you can see this heavy equipment was brought in. that was just brought in today to start the cleanup, official cleanup process for the neighborhood tomorrow. 37 homes here were destroyed. work on three of them begins tomorrow. workers in riot gear hosed down to clean up toxicity. >> we were hoping to start today. the site is not ready unless we can do it 100% correct, we're not gonna do it. >> reporter: some damaged cars were removed but those completely charred won't be taken away until tomorrow. crews will had use these devices to check air quality. >> this will monitor any fugitive dust or emissions coming off the site and we'll be able to collect them and find out if there's anything truly hazardous. >> while the cleanup preparations were underway, this resident was at a nearby gymnasium talking with his health representative. he says his biggest concern is his roommate who was severely injured. >> he had like 75% burn. he's
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)